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Standards

CE Categories

The Personal Protective Equipment Directives (89/686/CEE) and (93/68/CEE) have been enacted by the European Community to ensure harmonisation of regulations regarding testing of all PPE sold within the community. All gloves of intermediate and complex design must now be tested independently to ascertain their performance and ensure their safety. They must, if they meet these standards, carry a CE Mark on the gloves or their packaging when it is not practical.

CE Category minimal risk

CE Category 1 - Minor risks
Simple design equipment for minor risks whom effects have no consequence on the user safety or are easily reversible. Equipment from this category requires a self-certification by the manufacturer. An equipment from category 1 brings a basic comfort and it is compulsory to use an equipment from category 2 or 3 if the work presents the least danger.



CE Category 2 - Intermediary risks
Equipment for intermediary risks which requires tests in conformity with European standards and of a type check delivered by an authorised laboratory



CE Category 3 - Serious or irreversible risks
Equipment for serious, irreversible or deadly risks which are submitted to the same tests than the equipment of category 2 completed by a compulsory production quality control : either by a quality guarantee system (samples taken at random by an authorised organism), or by a controlled quality assurance system (system controlled by an authorised organism).

 

Industry Standards

EN 388 - Mechanical Risks

This standard applies to all kinds of protective gloves in respect of physical and mechanical aggressions caused by abrasion, blade cut, puncture and tearing.
Protection against mechanical hazards is expressed by a pictogram followed by four numbers (performance levels), each representing test performance against a specific hazard. The ‘Mechanical Risks’ pictogram is accompanied by a 4-digit code:

 

Resistance to Abrasion 0-4
Based on the number of cycles required to abrade through the sample glove.

Blade Cut Resistance 0-5
Based on the number of cycles required to cut through the sample at a constant speed.

Tear Resistance 0-4
Based on the amount of force required to tear the sample.

Puncture Resistance 0-4
Based on the amount of force required to pierce the sample with a standard-sized point.

View Infographic

EN 374 - Chemical risks

This standard specifies the capability of gloves to protect the user against chemicals and/or micro-organisms.
The 'chemical resistant' glove pictogram must be accompanied by a 3-digit code. This code refers to the code letters of the chemicals (from a list of 12 standard defined chemicals), for which a breakthrough time of at least 30 minutes has been obtained.

 

EN 374 -3

The ‘low chemical resistant’ or ‘waterproof ’ glove pictogram is to be used for those gloves that do not achieve a breakthrough time of at least 30 minutes against at least three chemicals from the defined list, but which comply with the penetration test.

 

 

EN 374 Micro-organisms risks



The ‘micro-organism’ pictogram is to be used when the glove conforms to at least a performance level 2 for the penetration test.

 

Warning: The chemical data information does not necessarily reflect the actual duration in the workplace.

EN 511 - Risk by cold


This standard applies to any gloves to protect the hands against convective and contact cold down to -50oC.

The ‘cold hazard’ pictogram is accompanied by a 3-digit number:


Resistance to Convective Cold 0- 4
Based on the thermal insulation properties of the glove which are obtained by measuring the transfer of cold via convection.

Resistance to Contact Cold 0-4
Based on the thermal resistance of the glove material when exposed to contact with a cold object.

Penetration by Water 0-1
0 = water penetration
1 = no water penetration

All gloves must achieve at least performance level 1 for abrasion and tear.

EN 407 - Thermal risks

This standard specifies thermal performance for protective gloves against heat and/or fire. The nature and degree of protection is shown by a pictogram followed by a series of six performance levels, relating to specific protective qualities. Gloves must also achieve at least Performance level 1 for abrasion and tear.
The 'heat and flame' pictogram is accompanied by a 6-digit number:

 

Resistance to flammability 0-4
Based on the length of time the material continues to burn and glow after the source of ignition is removed. The seams of the glove shall not come apart after an ignition time of 15 seconds.

Contact heat resistance 0-4
Based on the temperature range (100-500oC) at which the user will feel no pain for at least 15 seconds. If an EN level 3 or higher is obtained, the product shall record at least EN level 3 in the flammability test. Otherwise, the maximum contact heat level shall be reported as level 2.

Convective heat resistance 0-4
Based on the length of time the glove is able to delay the transfer of heat from a flame. A performance level shall only be mentioned if a performance level of 3 or 4 is obtained in the flammability test.

Radiant heat resistance 0-4
Based on the length of time the glove is able to delay the transfer of heat when exposed to a radiant heat source. A performance level shall only be mentioned if a performance level 3 or 4 is obtained in the flammability test.

Resistance to small splashes of molten metal 0-4
The number of molten metal drops required to heat the glove sample to a given level. A performance level shall only be mentioned if a performance level 3 or 4 is obtained in the flammability test.

Resistance to large splashes of molten metal 0-4
The weight of molten metal required to cause smoothing or pin-holing across a simulated skin placed directly behind the glove sample. The test is failed if metal droplets remain stuck to the glove material or if the specimen ignites.

Our thermal gloves


EN 421 - Ionizing radiation
This standard applies to gloves to protect from Ionising Radiation and Radioactive Contamination.


Protection from Radioactive Contamination.

To protect from radioactive contamination, the glove has to be liquid proof and needs to pass the penetration test.



• For gloves used in containment enclosures, the glove shall pass in addition to a specific air pressure leak test.
• Materials may be modelled by their behaviour to ozone cracking. This test is optional and can be used as an aid to selecting gloves.


Protection from Ionising Radiation
To protect from ionising radiation, the glove has to contain a certain amount of lead or equivalent metal, quoted as lead equivalence. This lead equivalence must be marked on each glove.

 

Information taken from www.globus.co.uk

 

 

 

 

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